Home

How to create an adorable candle from scratch using a silicone mould

Candlemaker Veronica Gutierrez guides us through the prepping, pouring and demoulding process for any shape

Candlemaker Veronica Gutierrez guides us through the prepping, pouring and demoulding process for any shape

a small, white dog-shaped candle sits on a pink pedestal, with pink tennis balls sitting around it, in front of a pink background. two small white dogs wearing pink sweaters are behind the candle.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

Getting playful with candles is my favourite thing to do, but I know prepping and demoulding unique shapes can be a bit of a challenge. So, I created a step-by-step tutorial on the best way to use a candle mould, including the sometimes tricky demoulding technique. I used a cute dog mould that I bought on Etsy, but there are lots of options you can purchase from different shops and makers online. Remember to check the product description before buying to ensure the silicone is safe for candlemaking. Watch the video below and then scroll down for the full how-to. 

What you'll need:

  • Wick
  • Scissors
  • Needle or knife, optional
  • Tweezers, optional
  • Silicone candle mould
  • Bag of elastic bands (I used 8-10, but it depends on the size of your mould.)
  • Wax (The amount required will depend on the mould you are using. I needed about 4 cups of soy wax for the dog mould.)
  • Pour pot (or heat-safe metal measuring cup) for the wax
  • Small pot, for boiling water
  • Wooden chopstick, for stirring
  • Tongs or well-fitting oven mitts, optional
  • Clothespin
  • Paint (I highly recommend using non-toxic, water-based acrylic paint. It's the safest choice in candlemaking.)
  • Paintbrush
candlemaking supplies on a pink pedestal in front of a pink background: a paintbrush, silver pour pot, bowl of wax pellets, silicone candle mould, pink paint, candle wick, a wooden stir stick and pink elastic bands.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

How to do it: 

Part 1 - Prepping the candle mould

1. Use scissors to cut a wick that is about 8 inches longer than your mould requires.

2. Thread the wick through the small hole at the top of the mould so there's 4 inches of wick hanging out at both ends. Tweezers are a great option if you find it difficult to push the wick through using just your fingers. If your mould doesn't have a hole, you can carefully make a small one at the top using a needle or the tip of a knife. 

3. Place your mould flat on a table, upside down, so the opening is facing upward.

4. Wrap elastic bands around the mould to secure it tightly and keep it from opening when the hot wax is added. Set aside. 

a pink silicone candle mould on a pink pedestal in front of a pink background. two hands reach into the frame from the left, adding pink rubber bands to the mould.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

Part 2 - Pouring and demoulding

1. Pour your unmelted wax into the pour pot (or heat-safe metal measuring cup).

2. Add water to a small pot until it's about one-third full. Bring to a boil. Place the pour pot in the boiling water to melt the wax. Or, if you're using a heat-safe metal measuring cup, place it directly on the burner. Wait 5-10 minutes or until the wax is liquefied/looks clear. You can gently stir with a wooden chopstick, if needed. (Handles on pour pots and heat-safe metal measuring cups are generally safe for holding, but we recommend using tongs or well-fitting oven mitts.)

3. Turn the burner off and remove the pour pot or measuring cup. Place it on a heat-safe surface.

4. Carefully pour the hot wax into your mould until it reaches the edge of the mould.

a pink silicone candle mould wrapped with pink rubber bands, sitting on a pink pedestal in front of a pink background. a hand reaches into the left of the frame, pouring melted wax into the mould from a small silver pour pot.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

5. Place a clothespin on the edge of the mould to centre the wick and hold it in place. (Each side of the clothespin will be held up by the edge of the mould.) See video. 

6. Wait at least 10 hours for the candle to cure. It's best to wait this long for a shaped candle with lots of detail to cure, no matter what type of wax you use. You want to make sure it's firm before demoulding.

7. Once your candle has cured, slowly stretch out the edges of the mould, pulling it away from the candle. Push the bottom of the mould with your thumbs to help loosen the candle and gently unravel the mould until the candle separates. It's very important to take your time with this process; it should take about 3-5 minutes, and the slower you stretch and unravel the mould, the better. You want to make sure the candle feels loose in the mould. If you're struggling to remove your candle, put the mould (with candle) in the freezer for about 45 minutes, and as soon as you take it out, try the process again.

two hands unravelling a white candle from a pink silicone candle mould, in front of a pink background.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

8. Once you have the candle out of the mould, use scissors to trim the wick. Cut the top so it's about an inch long, then cut the bottom right at the end of the candle.

9. Lastly, you can decorate your candle to make it unique. I added a cute little pink nose using a small paintbrush and acrylic paint. Play around with adding details! If you have another type of candle mould with a unique shape, adding small rocks or colourful rhinestones can add to the look of your candle. 

Note: Decorative items such as dried flowers, wood, herbs, stones or gemstones in very small amounts are safe to add to your candle but should never be added in large amounts that go over the wick. Using any of these in large quantities, or adding glitter or mica powder to the top of the candle, will not allow the wick to burn properly and could potentially be unsafe. Glitter and mica powder may cause the flame to extinguish on its own, causing the candle not to burn properly.  

closeup on a white, dog-shaped candle on a pink pedestal in front of a pink background. a hand with a paintbrush reaches into frame on the left, applying pink paint to the dog's nose.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

10. Now you've made the cutest dog candle from scratch! Adorable candles like this one can be hard to burn, but you can definitely light them! I recommend waiting 3 days before burning to ensure the candle is completely cured. 

closeup on a white dog-shaped candle on a pink pedestal in front of a pink background. pink tennis balls sit at the base of the pedestal.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)
a small, white dog-shaped candle sits on a pink pedestal, with pink tennis balls sitting around it, in front of a pink background. two small white dogs wearing pink sweaters are behind the candle, sniffing it.
(Photography by Michael Kai Young)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Veronica Gutierrez is the CEO and creative director of This Candle Is Lit, a creative candle studio located in Toronto. She began her journey by creating candles for her son's first birthday and is now working with brands to create unique pieces just for them! She also has her own line of candles and runs monthly candle workshops in the city. You can find her at thiscandleislit.com and @thiscandle.islit.

Add some “good” to your morning and evening.

From life's little projects to its big questions; the latest in food, style, relationships, work and money, home, wellness, pets and travel delivered directly to your inbox each week.

...

The next issue of CBC Life Newsletter will soon be in your inbox.

Discover all CBC newsletters in the Subscription Centre.opens new window

now