TOPIC: COVID-19

Higgs doubles down, blames poor Vitalité management for costly travel nurse contracts

Premier Blaine Higgs is disputing claims by the CEO of Vitalité Health Network that costly travel nurse contracts were the result of a refusal by his government to approve other, less expensive options to deal with the staffing crisis in 2022.

Winnipeg lawsuit seeks billions of dollars for failed plan to manufacture COVID-19 vaccine in Manitoba

An American company that manufactures vaccines is being sued in Winnipeg for billions of dollars following a failed plan to produce a COVID-19 vaccine supply in Manitoba during the pandemic.

COVID-19 on the rise in Alberta as summer approaches

Albertans can expect a further COVID-19 bump this summer, driven by yet another crop of new variants, experts are cautioning.

Sudbury researcher disappointed Ontario ends COVID-19 wastewater surveillance

A researcher in Sudbury, Ont., says he’s disappointed the province is ending its wastewater surveillance program to track COVID-19 and other viruses in municipal systems.
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Road to November: Louisiana, and the impact of COVID-19 on the New Orleans tourism industry, Cost-cutting, strike action and crisis in Alberta’s health-care system, Terror attacks and a fresh lockdown in France

Our Road to November series on the U.S. election concludes in New Orleans, La. today, where tourism has been hit hard by COVID-19 — and we talk to Washington Post reporter Chelsea Janes about how the presidential candidates spent the last weekend of the campaign. Then, in the middle of a pandemic, Alberta's health-care system is in crisis. We discuss cost-cutting measures, recent strike action and why some doctors are leaving the province with Guy Smith, president of the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees; Trevor Tombe, associate professor of economics at the University of Calgary; and Lorian Hardcastle, associate professor researching health-care policy and law, also at the University of Calgary. Plus, we received a large response to last week's interview with three residents in long-term care homes. We'll share some of your letters today, and hear from Breanne Klassen, a therapeutic recreationist at a home in Ontario, about how her work with residents has changed. And we turn to France, where two terror attacks in quick succession have been followed by a new COVID-19 lockdown. We discuss the mood in the country with freelance journalist Gilli Alexis, and Rim-Sarah Alouane, legal scholar at the University of Toulouse Capitole.
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Road to November: Louisiana, and the impact of COVID-19 on the New Orleans tourism industry

Our Road to November series on the U.S. election concludes in New Orleans, La. today, where tourism has been hit hard by COVID-19 — and we talk to Washington Post reporter Chelsea Janes about how the presidential candidates spent the last weekend of the campaign.
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Road to November: Wisconsin and voter suppression; economist Jeff Rubin on globalization and The Expendables; rising Canadian basketball star Jamal Murray; and the pandemic is inspiring people to pick up the guitar

We continue our Road to November series on the U.S. election today, with a stop in Wisconsin to discuss voter suppression. We talk to Pastor Greg Lewis, of voting rights organization Souls to the Polls, and Molly McGrath, with the ACLU's national political advocacy department. Then, in his new book The Expendables, Canadian economist Jeff Rubin argues that globalization has not been good for organized labour or middle class wages — and warns people left behind in the economy will turn their backs on liberal democracy. Plus, the Toronto Raptors may be out of the NBA playoffs but basketball fans here can still cheer Jamal Murray, the rising Canadian star who is turning heads and leading his team, the Denver Nuggets, to success. We talk to Rowan Barrett, general manager and the executive vice-president of the Senior Men's Program for Canada Basketball, who has watched Jamal Murray play and develop for years. And we’re putting away the sourdough starter to talk about the latest pandemic past time: learning to play the guitar. We talk to Fort McMurray resident Chris Ash about why he decided to pick up the guitar — and Max Kerman, lead singer of the Canadian band Arkells, about why he’s been offering lessons.
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Road to November: Wisconsin and voter suppression

We continue our Road to November series on the U.S. election today, with a stop in Wisconsin to discuss voter suppression. We talk to Pastor Greg Lewis, of voting rights organization Souls to the Polls, and Molly McGrath, with the ACLU's national political advocacy department.
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Pandemic-born ice cream shop still thriving four years later

A Calgary entrepreneurial couple are celebrating four years of being in business this month. An impressive milestone considering they launched their small ice cream shop, Abbey's Creations, just three months into the pandemic. Not only did the business survive COVID times, it's been growing ever since.

N.B. expands COVID-19 wastewater monitoring and uses, moves to monthly reports

New Brunswick has expanded its COVID-19 wastewater monitoring system network, and is expanding its uses to include other infectious diseases, such as the flu and RSV.
A Toxic Year

More than 4 Albertans died — each and every day — from opioids in 2023

The four people pictured here represent a typical day’s death toll from opioid poisonings in Alberta last year, the deadliest on record for the province.

COVID-19 deaths increase to 4 in N.B., hospitalizations drop to 3, fewer than flu admissions

COVID-19 deaths in New Brunswick doubled to four week-over-week, while hospitalizations for or with the virus dropped to three from 19, and intensive care admissions dropped to none from one, data released by the province Tuesday shows.
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Vaccine complications explained

Dr. Samir Gupta on science working as it should with AstraZeneca's COVID vaccine

COVID-19 kills 2 more in N.B., child and youth hospitalized

COVID-19 has killed two more New Brunswickers, while a child under four and a youth aged five to 19 are among the 19 people hospitalized for or with the virus, data released by the province Tuesday shows.

High-risk Albertans urged to get another vaccine dose as COVID-19 cases ticking up

After trending downward for several months, COVID-19 is on the upswing in Alberta once again. A number of key indicators, including case counts, hospitalization numbers and positivity rates, are ticking up.

Ottawa will stop providing COVID-19 rapid tests to regions

The federal government plans to stop supplying provinces and territories with free COVID-19 rapid tests, which has an infection control epidemiologist worried about two-tiered health care, increased spread and increased health-care costs.

N.B. decides against updates to Clean Air Act to improve indoor air quality

Nearly a year after the legislature unanimously passed an Opposition motion to update the New Brunswick Clean Air Act and improve air quality in public buildings to reduce the spread of airborne illnesses, such as COVID-19, the government says it won't update the act after all.

New Brunswick mulls future of COVID-19 rapid tests, as virus kills 2, hospitalizes child under 4

New Brunswick is mulling the future of its COVID-19 rapid point of care testing program, as the virus claimed two more lives and hospitalized 17 people, including a child under four.

Manitoba to drop mask requirements in health-care settings on May 1

Starting May 1, the requirement for staff to wear masks whenever they're around patients will be lifted in most areas.

Sooner top doctor post is filled, the better for public health, says former medical officer

It's been more than six months since Dr. Jennifer Russell announced her resignation as New Brunswick's chief medical officer of health, but the Department of Health has no update on the search for her replacement.

COVID-19 kills 2 more in N.B., flu sends child under 4 and 2 youths to hospital

COVID-19 has killed two more New Brunswickers, while a child under four and two youths aged five to 19 are among those hospitalized by the flu, Tuesday's Respiratory Watch report shows.
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"We want to use science to help people." These two were the right scientists at the right time when they created one of the first Covid vaccines.

Drs. Uğur Şahin and Özlem Türeci founded their company BioNTech, to develop a breakthrough cancer treatment - RNA vaccines. With the COVID-19 pandemic, they realized they could pivot to save millions of lives, but they had to act fast. Watch Inside the Great Vaccine Race on CBC Gem.

COVID-19 kills New Brunswicker aged 45 to 64, 2 youth among those hospitalized by flu

A New Brunswicker aged 45 to 64 has died from COVID-19, while the flu sent eight people to the hospital, including two youth aged five to 19, updated data from the province Tuesday shows.
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Where can people find rapid antigen tests for COVID-19, and are they still useful?

During the pandemic, people in Saskatoon were able to pick up free COVID-19 self-tests at various locations in the city. For anyone who thought they might have the disease, it was a first step to see whether or not they were positive. COVID-19 is no longer a global health emergency, but people still get sick. So can residents still get those tests? CBC Saskatoon's Theresa Kliem has been looking into this question.

How to tell if a binder of Pokémon cards is worth thousands or less than $100

If you have a binder or box full of Pokémon cards sitting in your closet or basement, the contents could be worth thousands of dollars. Or maybe less than $100. It depends.