As It Happens

Brothers claim record for walking longest highline above Yosemite National Park

Brothers Daniel and Moises Monterrubio say they have taken in the view of California's Yosemite National Park from the longest highline the state has ever seen. 

'I don't think I can come up with the right words to describe it,' Moises Monterrubio says

A shot from Moises Monterrubio's GoPro camera while he was on the line. (Moises Monterrubio)

Brothers Daniel and Moises Monterrubio say they have taken in the view of California's Yosemite National Park from the longest highline the state has ever seen. 

"I don't think I can come up with the right words to describe it, because it was very unreal," Moises, 26, told As It Happens host Carol Off. 

Highlining is high-altitude slacklining, in which the walker has to cross from one end of a narrow strip of strong nylon webbing to the other while wearing a harness.  

The brothers claim their high-altitude act just broke the record for the longest highline ever walked in the park, or the state. Their line stretched 853 meters from Taft Point west across a series of gulleys that plunge 488 metres, to another point nicknamed "Your Mom."

That's three times the length of the previous record, according to The Associated Press. 

Moises on the line, with a waterfall in the background. (Scott Oller)

Daniel and Moises say planning the highline was the most dangerous part of the adventure. In early June, the brothers and a group of friends and highliners set up their line by hiking up from the valley floor, rappelling down from the cliffs above and manoeuvring through countless tree branches.

Moises crosses the highline, with the peaks of Yosemite park in the background. (Ryan Sheridan)

That danger, Moises said, made it all the more rewarding when they were finally able to try it out. 

Daniel was the first to try out the line on June 10, and said it was the most amazing highline experience he's ever had. 

"Just taking in all the views, like the waterfall, the sunsets," he said. "I got to walk one time at sunset and that was probably my favourite experience from the other walks."

Daniel on the line during sunset. (Scott Oller/Scott Oller Films via Associated Press)

While the goal of highlining is to cross without falling, Daniel said the closest he got to a perfect run was 200 metres from the other side.

Moises, meanwhile, walked the line in 37 minutes without a fall. So did fellow highliner Eugen Cepoi, Moises' mentor.

"I was just thinking about all the work that was done and even while being on the slackline, you would look down at the bottom and all the memories of days before," he said. 

The team spent six days at Yosemite National Park. (Steve Griggs)

He said when he looked up and saw the famous rock face, El Capitan, in front of him, it was "the cherry on top." 

Overall, the group spent six days in Yosemite. They have plans for another highline walk, possibly in Mexico. 

"I don't want to get too many details because it's still, like, in the planning. But yeah, we're going big," Daniel said. 


Written by Sarah Jackson with files from The Associated Press. Produced by Jeanne Armstrong. 


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